Religious Experience and Scientific Method

Religious Experience and Scientific Method

Religious Experience and Scientific Method

Religious Experience and Scientific Method

Excerpt

Whatever else the word God may mean, it is a term used to designate that Something upon which human life is most dependent for its security, welfare and increasing abundance. That there is such a Something cannot be doubted. The mere fact that human life happens, and continues to happen, proves that this Something, however unknown, does certainly exist.

Of course one can say that there are innumerable conditions which converge to sustain human life, and that is doubtless the fact. But in that case either one of two things is true. Either the universe is a single individual organic unity, in which case it is the whole indivisible universe that has brought forth and now sustains human life; or else certain of these sustaining conditions are more critically, ultimately and constantly important for human welfare than are others. According to the first view God would be, or involve, the whole universe: according to the second he would be those most important conditions which, taken collectively, constitute the Something which must have supreme value for all human living. The word God, taken with its very minimum meaning, is the name for this Something of supreme value. God may be much more than this, but he is certainly this by definition. In this sense, with this minimum . . .

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