Marx, Schumpeter, & Keynes: A Centenary Celebration of Dissent

Marx, Schumpeter, & Keynes: A Centenary Celebration of Dissent

Marx, Schumpeter, & Keynes: A Centenary Celebration of Dissent

Marx, Schumpeter, & Keynes: A Centenary Celebration of Dissent

Synopsis

Starting with the Victorian age, this study moves through the shifting power of US Protestantism and Catholicism into an intense period of immigration and pluralism. Later chapters include the Jewish experience, African American religion, evangelical movements and 20th-century religious thought.

Excerpt

It all started in England in June of 1982. Anticipating a few days in London, I had written to a friend, David Whitehead, asking him to set a dinner date including Mark and Ruth Blaug. I had previously met David and Mark during my sabbatical year, 1979, at the Institute of Education of the University of London. Blaug befriended me, apparently happy to spend long lunches discussing Marx and other scholarly interests. On his advice, I familiarized myself with the "progress in science" debate. This began my intellectual curiosity about Popper and Lakatos : their arguments seem well-reasoned enough, but somehow both wrong and unfair in their biting criticism of Marx and Marxist economics.

"You choose the restaurant, and the sky's the limit," I said. We decided on Boulestin's, a truly elegant restaurant off Covent Garden, and there I enjoyed one of the two finest culinary experiences of my life. During the course of a wide‐ ranging conversation (dinner was a four-hour event!), we discussed the fact that next year would be the 100th anniversary of the death of Karl Marx and of the birth of John Maynard Keynes, and I commented that I would be teaching my Marx classes during the fall and spring terms. Inspired by the good company, food, and surroundings, I probed Blaug to see if he could be enticed to Denver. Given his lively curiosity and openness to diverse points of view, as well as his sharp criticisms of different traditions in economic thought, I knew that with him in attendance we could truly celebrate the anniversaries of Marx and Keynes. I was especially delighted with the idea because Blaug's critical views are an antidote to my enthusiasm for Marx. Thus I invited him to deliver a public lecture as well as meet with my classes at the University of Colorado. Blaug, who did not relish the idea of "hashing over Keynes" one more time, reminded me that it was also the centenary of the birth of Schumpeter. He promised a paper on Schumpeter if I could put the event together. Voila! Our Marx, Schumpeter, and Keynes centenary celebration was underway.

A fellow economist, University of Colorado President Arnold Weber, promised funding for the conference, as did our chancellor, Gene Nordby. Col-

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