Multiple and Intersecting Identities in Qualitative Research

Multiple and Intersecting Identities in Qualitative Research

Multiple and Intersecting Identities in Qualitative Research

Multiple and Intersecting Identities in Qualitative Research

Synopsis

This book extends the current discourse on the role of cultural knowledge in qualitative research, especially research conducted by women of color within their own community. Each author reports on her attempts to conceptualize herself as a researcher while simultaneously trying to honor her cultural connectedness and knowledge. As women researchers analyzing the personal and professional contexts in which their research was conducted, the authors argue that their gender, race, religion, and status have played critical roles in their research agendas. They offer a female perspective, though not a feminist critique per se, for they believe that gender does play a significant role in their research efforts. Equally important, they explore the role that race has played in their research, whether as women of color or white women conducting research among people of color. In reflecting on how their unique positionality allows them to understand relationships across many boundaries, the authors observe how, in most cases, because of their position as women and/or people of color, they have not had some of the traditional problems associated with access to multicultural sites. However, they have encountered other issues and they share how, as researchers, they met and resolved these issues for their particular settings. Each author also discusses how, in addressing these issues, she labored to meet the standards of academia, often at a personal cost. This book challenges existing paradigms by questioning the assumption of objectivity in research. It is essential reading--informative, provocative, and engaging--for researchers and students in research methods, women's studies, critical theory, and cross-cultural studies.

Excerpt

This book is a collection of reflections of researchers as they have attempted to analyze the personal and professional context in which their research was conducted. As women researchers, young in our professional lives, we argue that our gender, race, religion, and status have played a significant role in our research agendas. As women researchers, we offer a female perspective, though not a feminist critique, per se, for we believe that our gender does play a significant role in our research efforts. in addition, race, religion, and class, whether as women of color or a White woman conducting research among people of color, has played a significant role in our research. Our unique positionality allows us to understand relationships across many boundaries.

We have found that in most cases, because of our position as women and/or people of color, we have not had some of the traditional problems associated with access to the culturally specific settings. We have, however, encountered a number of other issues, and in this book, we share how, as researchers, we have met and resolved these issues for our particular settings. Moreover, each chapter author discusses how, in addressing these issues, she labored to meet the standards of academia, often at a personal cost.

Overview

Betty Merchant's chapter “pairs” with Martha Zurita's, in the sense that the two chapters present their contrasting perspectives of a study of limited-and non-English speaking students, in which they attempted to collaborate with one another. in chapter 1, Betty Merchant focuses on the complex issues that arose while she, as a White researcher, supervised Martha Zurita, a Mexican-American graduate student who was assisting her in studying the schooling experiences of newly arrived Mexican immigrants at a rural high school in which all but one of the educators were White. Martha Zurita, in chapter 2, focuses on her commitment to action research and on her per-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.