The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

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The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Sir Edward Shepherd Creasy prided himself, before all else, on being a " Man of Kent." He was born in that shire at Bexley in the year 1812, and was still a youngster when his father removed to Brighton and started there the time-honoured Brighton Gazette. The boy had a faculty for languages, and his father sent him, though rather late in the day, to Eton. There he won the Newcastle Scholarship in 1831—that is, in his twentieth year, the oldest scholar who ever sat for it. Some forty years later he himself became one of the scholarship examiners. Eton inspired two of his books, including " Memoirs of Eminent Etonians," which does not give us, unfortunately, his personal memories. It is only in the closing lines that he pauses to speak of the "heartfelt gratitude and pride" with which he looks on " the time-honoured walls where so much of the worth of four centuries has been nurtured." From Eton Creasy went to Cambridge, and was made a Fellow of King's in 1834. Three years later he was called to the Bar; and in 1840 he was appointed Professor of Modern and Ancient History at London University. The substance of his courses of lectures there reappeared in some of his later histories, including his " Historical and Critical Account of the Several Invasions of England," and his unfinished "History of England from the Earliest to the Present Time." The latter work was designed to form five volumes, only two of which appeared.

After being called to the Bar he practised for twenty years on the Home Circuit, and was for a time assistant-judge at the Westminster Sessions Court. In 1860 came his great preferment, when he was appointed Chief-Justice of Ceylon, and received knighthood. Ten years after he returned to England broken in health, and about the year 1872 he finally retired, his country seat being Moira House, Hampton Wick. He died January 27, I878, at 15 Cecil Street, Strand. His most popular work has undoubtedly been and is still "The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World," which is here reprinted. On its original appearance, it is worth note that it not only delighted the general reader, but won high praise from men versed in military matters. In the same year, 1852, appeared his work already mentioned, on "The . . .

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