The Horse and Jockey from Artemision: A Bronze Equestrian Monument of the Hellenistic Period

The Horse and Jockey from Artemision: A Bronze Equestrian Monument of the Hellenistic Period

The Horse and Jockey from Artemision: A Bronze Equestrian Monument of the Hellenistic Period

The Horse and Jockey from Artemision: A Bronze Equestrian Monument of the Hellenistic Period

Synopsis

In 1928, and again in 1937, parts of a large-scale bronze horse and nearly complete jockey were recovered from the sea off Cape Artemision in Greece, where they went down in a shipwreck. These original Hellenistic sculptures, known together as the "Horse and Jockey Group from Artemision," are among the very few surviving bronze sculptures from antiquity. Sean Hemingway has been allowed by the National Museum in Athens to investigate the horse and jockey statuary group as no one ever has before, and in this book, combining archaeological and art historical methods of investigation, he provides the first in-depth study of this rare and beautiful monument. New technical analyses of the statues by Helen Andreopoulou-Mangou form an appendix to the volume. Hemingway begins with an introduction to Hellenistic bronze statuary. He then recounts with riveting detail the discovery and painstaking restoration of the statue group, describing the technique of its creation and carefully reviewing scholarly knowledge and speculation about it. He also provides a valuable compendium of what is known about ancient Greek horse racing, the most prestigious and splendid of all Greek sports. His study will become the definitive resource on this unique sculpture from ancient Greece.

Excerpt

The idea for this book first came out of a seminar I took on Greek bronze statuary held at Bryn Mawr College in 1992 under the joint instruction of Brunilde Sismondo Ridgway and Kim J. Hartswick. I only began work, however, in 1994, while I was a Fulbright Scholar at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, when I received permission from the National Archaeological Museum in Athens to study the Artemision bronzes as the topic of my doctoral dissertation for Bryn Mawr College (completed in 1997). Preliminary results from this study were first presented at the Archaeological Institute of America's annual meetings in 1995 and 1998. Some of the technical results were presented in a paper at the Thirteenth International Bronze Congress held at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1996 and published in the first volume of the proceedings of the conference (Hemingway 2000). An earlier summary of the evidence for the Horse's lost bridle was published as an article by the author in S tephanos: Studies in Honor of Brunilde Sismondo Ridgway (Philadelphia, 1998). I am grateful to the University of Pennsylvania Press and the Journal of Roman Archaeology for allowing me to print revised versions of the above-mentioned texts here.

There are many people who have contributed to the realization of this book and to whom I owe my appreciation. Since this work is a direct adaptation of my doctoral dissertation, I must begin by thanking my Ph. D. advisor, Professor Brunilde S. Ridgway of Bryn Mawr College, for her untiring guidance and support from near and far. This study could not have been undertaken without the kind and enduring assistance of many people at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. In particular, I wish to express my gratitude to Dr. Katie Demakopoulou, Dr. Helen Andreopoulou-Mangou, the late Dr. Artemis Onasoglou, Dr. Katerina Rhomaiopoulou, and Dr. Olga Tzachou-Alexandri. I am indebted to Carol C. Mattusch for many thoughtful conversations and for her insightful commentary on a preliminary draft. Special thanks go to Kate Toll, Rose Vekony, and Peter Dreyer, my editors at the University of California Press, Berkeley, and to Steven Lattimore and anonymous readers at Berkeley for their comments.

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