Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West

Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West

Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West

Twenty Thousand Roads: Women, Movement, and the West

Synopsis

"Virginia Scharff's wonderfully readable account of women in motion complicates and enriches our understanding of the nineteenth and twentieth century Wests. Her gendered remapping of the regional landscape explodes traditional notions of western movement. All students of women and gender, travel and place, the West and America, would do well to read this excellent book."--David M. Wrobel, author of "Promised Lands: Promotion, Memory, and the Creation of the American West

"Virginia Scharff claims for women what has long been central to the masculine mythology of the West--free movement and its many gifts, real and imagined. Her book is as exhilarating and as intellectually and emotionally expansive as our enduring dream of flight across the American land."--Elliott West, author of "The Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers, & the Rush to Colorado

""Brilliant is not a word that is often a part of my critical vocabulary, but brilliantly is how "Twenty Thousand Roads begins. When writing of Sacagawea and Susan Magoffin, Virginia Scharff shows vividly how a single life can be a source of sophisticated cultural analysis without becoming an academic artifact or an object of condescension."--Richard White, author of "It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own: A New History of the American West

Excerpt

Personally, I would like to ask, what is all of this fuss about? She cannot be buried in other places. She is here on the hill in the cemetery. She can only be buried in one place… . Fraud is not with the Indians in matters of this kind. They do not put up a story just to have it startling and out-of-place. James McAdam, to Grace Raymond Hebard through interpreter James E. Compton, Fort Washakie, July 21, 1929

Some of our people say she was the same woman, others say she was not. Statement of Mrs. Weidemann, Elbowwoods, N. D., February 3, 1925, to Charles Eastman, in Sioux

So many women were there that she might have been there and not noticed, but there were women, many of them. Hebe-chee-chee, to Grace Raymond Hebard through interpreter James E. Compton, Fort Washakie, July 22, 1929

Se car ja we au Dead. William Clark, Cashbook for 1825–1828 . . .

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