The Six Sigma Revolution: How General Electric and Others Turned Process into Profits

The Six Sigma Revolution: How General Electric and Others Turned Process into Profits

The Six Sigma Revolution: How General Electric and Others Turned Process into Profits

The Six Sigma Revolution: How General Electric and Others Turned Process into Profits

Synopsis

'In The Six Sigma Revolution, George communicates the principles of Six Sigma to audiences at every level and enables an immediate understanding of what is for many an intimidating field.'-Ross Leher, Chairman and CEO RWI Interactive Information Services'The Six Sigma Revolution is a powerful profit-building tool and an indispensable resource for leaders wanting to drive lasting improvement.'-Mike Delaney, Senior Vice President Marketing and Strategic Planning Unifi, Inc.

Excerpt

As the Business Leader for General Electric's Access, one of GE businesses, I am keenly aware of the impact Six Sigma has had since Jack Welch announced his commitment to it in 1995.

In that year I heard Jack proclaim that “Six Sigma is the most important initiative GE has ever undertaken … it is part of the genetic code of our future leadership.” When he made formal the edict that 40 percent of a business leader's bonus was going to be determined by his or her Six Sigma performance, it was quite apparent that Jack was not just committed to Six Sigma, he was making it a way of life at GE.

While working at GE Access, I came across George Eckes, an external consultant that GE Capital had hired to assist in their course design and delivery. George's knowledge and experience in Six Sigma was obvious, but the key for me in hiring him was how practical and easy he made what could be such a difficult subject. While some make it difficult and awkward, George not only made Six Sigma practical, he made it fun. He also was particularly good at getting my attention as a business leader and challenging me personally to get involved in the initiative.

Reading this book, The Six Sigma Revolution, is like attending one of George's seminars. In easy-to-read chapters, he has successfully turned this cutting edge management approach into easy-tounderstand language.

He begins with a history of the quality movement in the twentieth century and shows how Six Sigma contrasts and compares with previous efforts. He goes on to explain the key ingredients of Six Sigma. In Chapter 2 he covers the strategic component of Six Sigma: Business Process Management. This chapter is one that other books on Six Sigma do not include with the detail that . . .

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