International Radio Journalism: History, Theory and Practice

International Radio Journalism: History, Theory and Practice

International Radio Journalism: History, Theory and Practice

International Radio Journalism: History, Theory and Practice

Synopsis

Radio journalists have witnessed much of the history of the twentieth century. From early documentary recordings, to the ground-breaking war reporting of Ed Murrow and Richard Dimbleby, to the sophisticated commentaries of Alistair Cooke and reporters such as Fergal Keane. International Radio Journalism explores the way radio has covered the most important stories this century and the way in which it continues to document events in Britan, America, Europe and many other countries around the world. International Radio Journalism covers both theory and practice for students of radio journalism, reporters, editors and producers. The book details training and professional standards in writing, presentation, technology, editorial ethics and media law in America, Britain, Australia and other English speaking countries and examines the major public sector broadcast networks such as the BBC, CBC, NPR and ABC as well as the work of commercial and small public radio stations.Timothy Crook investigates the way in which news reporting has been influenced by governments and media conglomerates and identifies an undercurrent of racial and sexual discrimination throughout the history of radio news. There are chapters on media law for broadcast journalists, the implications of multi-media and new technologies, digital applications in radio news, and glossaries which cover the skills of voice presentaion, writing radio news and broadcast vocabulary.

Excerpt

Radio journalism has been enormous fun, thoroughly exhausting, a decent way of making a living, and a constant education in life. My career began with an interview at the London College of Printing in 1978 when the first editor of UK's Independent Radio News, Dr Fred Hunter, was recruiting trainees for the first vocational radio journalism course in Britain outside the BBC. Up until this time the BBC had been the model for radio journalism practice in Britain. Their reign of cultural domination was at an end. I was an aspiring poet going through a George Orwell Down and Out in Paris and London phase and working as a roadsweeper for the Corporation of London. God knows what sort of picture I must have presented. I was applying for the magazine journalism course and, towards the end of an aggressive interview, Dr Hunter piped up 'Would you like to work in radio?' My weak response: 'I suppose so,' was quickly followed up with the question 'Why?'. The answer, 'Because I like the sound of my own voice' is I think an important lesson on how not to answer questions during an interview.

Fred must have been very desperate, because for some reason he offered me a place. There were several months of travelling, writing and a little journalistic freelancing in the Middle East before I turned up in a tiny box-room on the second floor of a tower block at London's Elephant and Castle. My experience of walking naively into the 1978 Israeli invasion of Southern Lebanon did not create a thirst within me for foreign or war reporting. Ignoring United Nations' advice I had travelled to the border only to be greeted with a sustained attack from Palestinian Katyusha rockets. I was convinced there were plenty of other people prepared to observe and write about man's inhumanity to man. Poems seemed to be a more creative and harmless way of fulfilling a role in society. There then . . .

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