Belly and Body in the Pauline Epistles

Belly and Body in the Pauline Epistles

Belly and Body in the Pauline Epistles

Belly and Body in the Pauline Epistles

Synopsis

Throughout history, the human belly has been regarded as both a source of shame and pride. Modern cultures, particularly in the West, have developed means to cultivate this part of the body through corsets, exercises, and revealing fashions. Does St. Paul address a culture in which the stomach ranks high? This study aims to answer the question and the results may be surprising.

Excerpt

I have incurred many debts in the course of this project. The present study was written during my sabbatical (1998/1999); I am grateful to the Norwegian Lutheran School of Theology (Det teologiske Menighetsfakultet, Oslo), where I teach, for this opportunity. I owe thanks to the library there for patiently providing me with the necessary material. Most of the work was, however, carried out in Cambridge. I am very grateful for the hospitality and access to the library which was given me at Tyndale House. This excellent library for Biblical research made it possible for me to finish most of the work during my time there. I owe special thanks to the head librarian at Tyndale House, Dr David I. Brewer as well as his staff. I am grateful for the fellowship I enjoyed at Tyndale House, and to the scholars who were there together with me. This fellowship stimulated and contributed in various ways to my investigation. I owe special thanks to the Warden, Dr Bruce W. Winter, for his willingness to share his knowledge with me and to bring relevant literature to my attention, and for having introduced me to the Cambridge University Library as well as the library of the Classical Faculty. Without access to these libraries and the kind assistance which I found there, this investigation would not have been possible. These Cambridge days bring to mind also the kind hospitality which I enjoyed in the house of my hostess Mrs Veronica Becho.

Many colleagues at my own school encouraged me in this work; some also read and commented upon my manuscripts. I am grateful for the help I received from Dr Hans Kvalbein, Dr Reidar Hvalvik, Dr Oskar Skarsaune, and Martin Synnes. Special thanks are owed to my colleagues BjØrn-Helge Sandvei and Jan Schumacher, whom I consulted regarding Greek and Latin. My Latin teacher from college, BjØrgulv Rian, kindly assisted me with some Latin passages.

I owe thanks to the Research Council of Norway (Norges Forskningsråd) for granting me the necessary support to improve my English. This work has been done with much enthusiasm and patience . . .

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