The Troubled Path to the Pentagon's Rules on Media Access to the Battlefield: Grenada to Today

The Troubled Path to the Pentagon's Rules on Media Access to the Battlefield: Grenada to Today

The Troubled Path to the Pentagon's Rules on Media Access to the Battlefield: Grenada to Today

The Troubled Path to the Pentagon's Rules on Media Access to the Battlefield: Grenada to Today

Excerpt

Relations between the United States military and the American press soured during the Vietnam War. Many factors contributed to the mistrust that grew between the armed forces and the press, and blame can be laid on many doorsteps.

Since the Vietnam era, military-media relations have evolved to a far less hostile state. Today, perhaps chiefly as a result of successful operations since Vietnam, there is much greater mutual respect. Yet, an undertone of wariness lies just beneath the surface.

In the following monograph, Ms. Pascale Combelles-Siegel examines the difficult road traveled by the press and the military since Operation URGENT FURY in 1983. She focuses on the development of the 1992 Joint Doctrine for Public Affairs as a practical tool for reducing tension and providing press access to the battlefield. Her analysis reflects the duality of the relationship and the efforts of both communities to find a modus vivendi.

In the Information Age, media-military relations will become even more complex, and their impact on U.S. strategy, doctrine, and operations will grow. For that reason, the Strategic Studies Institute urges careful consideration of this monograph.

RICHARD H. WITHERSPOON
Colonel, U.S. Army
Director, Strategic Studies Institute . . .

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