Creative Knowledge: Old Trades and New Science

Creative Knowledge: Old Trades and New Science

Creative Knowledge: Old Trades and New Science

Creative Knowledge: Old Trades and New Science

Excerpt

So many children like to know why this and that are done in any handicraft that I thought the Christmas lectures of 1925 might be devoted to a consideration of the way in which new knowledge is always changing the old crafts, and, in particular, those which have helped to make England. And I must admit that my lectures are meant to have a moral, in that there is much more than fascination in the history of men's work; there is also the plain and urgent lesson that we must continually improve our handicrafts by means of the new knowledge which is always flowing in. We, of all nations, have to make our living by trading the work of our hands for food, and that which we make must be so good and interesting that other nations are anxious to trade with us. Also, there is an ideal which may seem far beyond us, and yet must always be aimed at: it is this, to give everybody work to do, and make everybody enjoy doing it well.

I am very well aware that I must seem to be a Jack-of-all-trades who is a master of none, when I try . . .

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