Retail Product Management: Buying and Merchandising

Retail Product Management: Buying and Merchandising

Retail Product Management: Buying and Merchandising

Retail Product Management: Buying and Merchandising

Synopsis

Providing the opportunity to acquire a deeper knowledge of a key area of retailing management - managing the product range - this important text is essential reading for those studying retail management or buying and merchandising as part of a degree course.Challenging yet clearly presented, it links academic theory to the buying and merchandising roles within retail organizations and current operational practice. It covers all retail operations which revolve around the procurement of products, including:*stock level management*allocation of outlet space for products*store design*mail order shopping*digital TV shopping.With learning objectives, boxed features, review questions, chapter introduction and summaries, a glossary of terms and international multi-sector case studies (including Reebok, Benetton, and The Body Shop), this significant text is a valuable reference for those involved in the retail sector.

Excerpt

Product management has always been at the centre of a healthy retail business. In the past, traders and merchants who thrived did so because they gave their customers a better product offer than their contemporaries; intuitively knowing what the consumer market will judge to be a superior product offer is the prowess of the retail entrepreneur. In the retail environment of modern developed economies, opportunities to exploit really new products are rare, yet talented retailers manage to create the illusion of newness and freshness in their product ranges by selecting and developing innovative product variations.

The aim of this book is to combine two managerial viewpoints. It blends product marketing with retail management, exploring an often hidden and overlooked part of the retail strategy. Products are the roots from which all other retail activity stems and as such they provide an appropriate focus for the text. However, recent retail history has highlighted the dangers of taking a one-sided view of product management. Products are managed for consumers; they are managed in order to create and respond to customer demand, to satisfy existing customers and attract potential new ones. In a crowded retail market, it is perilous to forget the close and complex relationship between products, consumers and the arena in which product exchange takes place.

In response to the physical product needs of consumers, retailers provide products where, when and however a window of shopping opportunity is created in busy lifestyles. Consumers combine these physical needs with personal aspirations and desires, and so the retailer has also to be seen as the right place to shop, to be in tune with its customers and to have desirable . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.