Pulitzer: A Life

Pulitzer: A Life

Pulitzer: A Life

Pulitzer: A Life

Synopsis

Acclaim for Denis Brian's Einstein: A Life "The best account.... Superb insight." -The Times (London) "Denis Brian's convincing picture...only makes our wonder grow at Einstein's sublime achievements." -The Washington Post "Does much to reveal the man behind the image.... Brian's intimate work proves that in literature, as in science, taking a careful look can be a rewarding endeavor." -Detroit Free Press "A fascinating, vastly enjoyable, deeply researched and fair account of Einstein the man." -Physics World "Exhaustively researched, almost obsessively detailed, written with unobtrusive informality, the book is exemplary as a record of Einstein's personal and professional life." -The Spectator (u.k.) "An utterly fascinating life of a great scientist, full of new insights and very readable." -Ashley Montagu "A fascinating read with more interesting material about Einstein as a human being than I have ever seen before.... Once I started it, I couldn't put it down." -Robert Jastrow, astrophysicist and bestselling author

Excerpt

Every issue of the paper presents an opportunity and a duty to say something courageous and true; to rise above the mediocre and conventional; to say something that will command the respect of the intelligent, the educated, the independent part of the community; to rise above fear of partisanship and fear of popular prejudice.

Joseph Pulitzer

Always fight for progress and reform; never tolerate injustice or corruption; always fight demagogues of all parties; never belong to any party; always oppose privileged classes and public plunder; never lack sympathy for the poor; always remain devoted to the public welfare; never be satisfied with merely printing the news; always be drastically independent; never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty.

Joseph Pulitzer

At eighteen, Joseph Pulitzer, a penniless, gangling Hungarian emigrant recruited in Europe to fight in the Civil War, threw himself from the ship bringing him to the United States and swam ashore to collect the bounty he thought should come to him and not to his recruiter. He fought in the Union Army and after the war, while working at various menial jobs, taught himself enough English to become a lawyer, a U.S. congressman, a superb journalist, and eventually the multimillionaire owner of two great American newspapers, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the New York World. At its peak in the late 1890s the World had a million daily readers.

Always a hands-on owner, Pulitzer focused on his high-minded, informed, and intelligent editorials.

One of his early editors, John Cockerill, who often handled the news pages, defined news as “any hitherto unprinted occurrence which involves the . . .

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