Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations

Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations

Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations

Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations

Synopsis

Everybody spied on everybody else during the Cold War. France had agents in the U.S., China had agents in East Germany, Poland had agents in Great Britain, and the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. had agents everywhere--in governments, in industry, in the military, and within each other's, and their own, intelligence agencies. A-Z entries provide a fascinating glimpse into the subterranean world, events, people and operations of the Cold War.

Excerpt

The Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations draws heavily upon the work of numerous scholars currently engaged in writing the history of the Cold War. Prominent among these scholars are Christopher Andrew of Cambridge University and Richard Aldrich of the University of Nottingham, whose works were particularly helpful in compiling the chronology of Cold War espionage that follows the Encyclopedia's A-Z. Of special interest are Andrew and Oleg Gordievsky's The KGB (1990) and the first volume of Andrew and Vasili Mitrokhin's The Mitrokhin Archive (1999). In these two volumes, the reader will find an account of how Russia's secret services, which were eventually known as the KGB, evolved in name, structure, and function between 1917 and 1990. Readers will also learn who ran these organizations, both in the Soviet Union and in major world capitals. Both books include a list of acronyms and abbreviations for major Soviet espionage organizations and related institutions that thrived during the Cold War. A note on how Russian names can be consistently transliterated is also provided. The Mitrokhin Archive also includes new discoveries made in the KGB archives and provides access to KGB secrets that had been unavailable until recently.

The reader will also benefit greatly from Battleground Berlin (1997), by David Murphy et al., an account of secret operations conducted by both sides in the Cold War after World War II. The work also provides access to authoritative accounts of operations and individuals that are incompletely recorded elsewhere and to details of American and British CIA/SIS operations, such as the Berlin tunnel, which were known to the KGB.

Richard Aldrich's The Hidden Hand (2002), like his earlier research on intelligence in the Pacific in World War II, includes studies on the secret politics, both personal and institutional, that occurred between 1941, when Russia became an ally of Great Britain, to the Profumo scandal in Britain in 1963. Stephen Dorril, a frequent writer on espionage in Britain, published a comprehensive study titled MI6 (2000), which . . .

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