Chinese Culture, Organizational Behavior, and International Business Management

Chinese Culture, Organizational Behavior, and International Business Management

Chinese Culture, Organizational Behavior, and International Business Management

Chinese Culture, Organizational Behavior, and International Business Management

Synopsis

The impact of Chinese culture can be felt in all areas of business and management in China, from Chinese firms to Western companies. This edited volume integrates contributions from multiple disciplines and countries, including China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, France, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. More than merely a compendium of how-to-do-business-in-China tips, this book examines the influence of culture--specifically, Confucian values and Chinese traditions--on foreign direct investment, joint ventures, management styles and theories, and organizational behavior.

Excerpt

With the largest consumer market in the world—consisting of 1.25 billion people—and an accelerating economy, China is hailed as one of the most important consumer markets of the twenty-first century. China is now the ninth-largest exporting country and tenth-largest importing country in the world (HSBC, 2000). Adjusted to its purchasing power, China is currently the second largest economy in the world, following the United States (World Bank, 2001).

The body of the book is divided into three parts: (I) Cultural Values and Influences, (II) Foreign Direct Investment and Joint Ventures, and (III) Managing the Chinese Organization.

PART I: CULTURAL VALUES AND INFLUENCES

In this part, six chapters focus on the impact of cultural values and influences on business practices in the People's Republic of China. These articles examine international business in China in the context of specific elements of Chinese culture, including Confucianism, guanxi, renzhi, renqing, and other Chinese customs and traditions. These cultural characteristics make China a unique place in which to do business and require a substantial adjustment in the Western way of thinking about management.

The chapters in part I make a collective contribution to the literature of management and international business by examining the uniqueness of China

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