Defeat in Detail: The Ottoman Army in the Balkans, 1912-1913

Defeat in Detail: The Ottoman Army in the Balkans, 1912-1913

Defeat in Detail: The Ottoman Army in the Balkans, 1912-1913

Defeat in Detail: The Ottoman Army in the Balkans, 1912-1913

Synopsis

No critical analysis has ever examined the specific reasons for the Ottoman defeat. Erickson's study fills this gap by studying the operations of the Ottoman Army from October 1912 through July 1913, and by providing a comprehensive explanation of its doctrines and planning procedures. This book is written at an operational level that details every campaign at the level of the army corps.

Excerpt

Defeat in detail is a doctrinal military term that means to defeat an enemy by destroying small portions of its armies instead of engaging its entire strength. Practically speaking, this happens when the mass or weight of one army is brought to bear against smaller portions of an opposing army, thereby achieving decisive superiority This is most often seen when an army divides itself into smaller groups, which can easily be separated and defeated in isolation. Sometimes defeat in detail is accomplished sequentially over time. Armies that suffer such a defeat almost always violate the principle of war of concentration of focus.

The Ottoman Empire engaged in the Balkan Wars of 1912-1913 against the Balkan League (composed of Bulgaria, Greece, Montenegro, and Serbia) and was decisively defeated in detail. In short summary, the Ottoman Empire split its field armies into groups and thereby created the conditions necessary for its enemies to achieve numerical superiority on the battlefield. In the initial engagements, this was further exaggerated by the Turks' attachment to the operational offensive, which robbed them of their inherent defensive advantage. The Ottoman armies were then defeated in succession. In the eighty-eight years since those wars, no critical analysis that examines the specific reasons for the Ottoman defeat has been conducted. This book seeks to fill that gap by examining the operations of the Ottoman Army from October 1912 through July 1913.

The historiography of the Balkan Wars exists in two layers separated by a half century of time. The first layer is expressed in Western European languages and consists mainly of the memoirs of Western observ-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.