Chinese Economic Transition and International Marketing Strategy

Chinese Economic Transition and International Marketing Strategy

Chinese Economic Transition and International Marketing Strategy

Chinese Economic Transition and International Marketing Strategy

Synopsis

As China's markets evolve, marketing strategy must adapt to meet changing circumstances. Alon and his contributors provide a comprehensive look at how economic transition affects marketings strategies across a wide range of industries, including telecommunications, the auto industry, the hospitality industry, the airline industry, textiles, cosmetics, and wine. In addition, they discuss the changing situation of joint ventures, collective enterprises, and state-owned businesses.

Excerpt

The only constant in China is change.

—Anonymous

China has been enjoying a high rate of economic growth in the past two decades and is the largest foreign direct investment (FDI) recipient, second only to the United States.

Business scholars have also accumulated a rich literature on firm performance in China. This volume provides a much-needed addition to the literature by publishing a series of insightful analyses on the marketing, managerial, and strategic consequences for key industries in China. Analyzing a cross section of industries in China bears a particular significance because the factor market is not efficient, and many government restrictions and barriers exist in different industries.

The authors of the book offer in-depth examinations on various international marketing and managerial strategies and their consequences to firms with different ownership structures across a wide range of industries. Their studies provide major functional strategies in key marketing areas, industry-specific strategies, and analyses of organizational structures and practice indigenous to China. All these efforts are especially helpful to academics as well as business practitioners in mature market economies to understand doing business in China.

The context for all industrial development, however, should be viewed in the larger context of the political economy. I would like to expose the readers to three possible areas that may have a pervasive effect on all businesses in China: (1) the transition from a relationship-based to a rule-

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