International Organizations: A Comparative Approach to the Management of Cooperation

International Organizations: A Comparative Approach to the Management of Cooperation

International Organizations: A Comparative Approach to the Management of Cooperation

International Organizations: A Comparative Approach to the Management of Cooperation

Synopsis

This new edition of a classic text, comprehensively revised throughout, focuses on the role of international organizations in the context of emerging challenges to the centrality of the nation-state in the international system, such as humanitarianism, environmentalism, new legal standards and regimes, and controversial concepts such as "civil society" and "globalism." As inter-governmental and international non-governmental activities are increasingly being merged, for example in the area of peace-keeping, this erodes the sanctity of the territorial state as the primary political unit. Similarly, technological and social changes such as the Internet, encourage "borderless" activities (legal and illegal) by non-state actors. This book provides the basis for students to consider international organizations against the backdrop of a thorough rethinking of our international system and its prospects for the future in the face of these fundamental and unprecedented developments.

Excerpt

In their management of cooperation, IGOs and INGOs perform a wide range of tasks, often of great complexity, which is why in this chapter we examine the way that IOs work. We look at the organizational ideology behind them and the way that this can shape their functioning. We also consider managerial efficiency and leadership effectiveness as elements that allow the organization to achieve its organizational ideology—or fall short of it. the structure of the institutions is identified as another factor affecting task performance, as also is innovation in processes used. the nature and shape of this institutional framework obviously must relate to the function and the specific tasks that the igo is expected to carry out. Political factors, however, often—almost inevitably—impose constraints on the purely rational considerations that go into setting up an effective management model. This has an impact not only on the organizational details of the IGO's institutions, but also on the power conferred by the member states, and hence the management of cooperation.

organizational ideology

In every organization some kind of organizational ideology develops that can shape the effectiveness of the IGO's task performance. Such an ideology, whether related to conflict resolution or economic, social, and humanitarian goals, is especially important to IGOs because creating consensus among the governing member states is all too often very difficult. the IO's own sense of self can act as a buffer for the bureaucracy as each member state strives to gain advantage for itself by virtue of its membership. Furthermore, a basic component of organizational ideology is the concern of the international staff in any organization to keep the bureaucracy in existence and, hopefully, to keep it

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