Military Persuasion in War and Policy: The Power of Soft

Military Persuasion in War and Policy: The Power of Soft

Military Persuasion in War and Policy: The Power of Soft

Military Persuasion in War and Policy: The Power of Soft

Synopsis

Cimbala analyzes "military persuasion"--the art of using armed force to support diplomacy, deterrence, crisis management, unconventional conflicts, peace operations, and other military activities short of major conventional war. As he shows, it calls for new methods and mind sets in diplomacy and in military operations. It also requires a U.S. public more tolerant of ambiguity and half measures, including the cutting of losses when necessary.

Excerpt

On September 11, 2001, the United States experienced an unprecedented attack on its homeland by foreign terrorists. Hijackers crashed two civilian airliners into the World Trade Center in New York City and a third plane into the Pentagon. A fourth seized aircraft crashlanded near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, apparently after passengers aware of their fate tried to regain control of the plane for the crew. Other hijackings that day by the same group of plotters may have been thwarted by luck or by local vigilance at airports. An estimated 3,000 American citizens and foreign nationals who were in the World Trade Center or the Pentagon when the planes struck were killed. The carnage and destruction at the World Trade Center site was so extensive and daunting to rescuers that an exact tabulation of victims defied the best efforts of investigators.

The attackers required no elaborate or high-technology weapons; nor did they employ commonly feared tools of mass destruction, such as nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons, to accomplish their aims. They used the simplest of devices: plastic knives and “box cutters” (an odd locution; essentially it means utility knives, used to open boxes in factories and retail stores). Armed with these simple weapons, a daring plan, and much bravado, the terrorists outwitted airline security, circumvented U.S. air defenses, confounded American intelligence, and inflicted a devastating humiliation on the world's “singular global superpower.”

The Bush administration soon placed the blame on Osama bin Laden, a Saudi national and former Afghan resistance leader against the So-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.