Nuclear Proliferation in the Indian Subcontinent: The Self-Exhausting "Superpowers" and Emerging Alliances

Nuclear Proliferation in the Indian Subcontinent: The Self-Exhausting "Superpowers" and Emerging Alliances

Nuclear Proliferation in the Indian Subcontinent: The Self-Exhausting "Superpowers" and Emerging Alliances

Nuclear Proliferation in the Indian Subcontinent: The Self-Exhausting "Superpowers" and Emerging Alliances

Synopsis

The failure of India and Pakistan to achieve their regional and international objectives through a nuclear capability has turned them into dissatisfied regional powers which, Peimani asserts, are being pushed toward the formation of two hostile alliances with Russia and China respectively. The rising alliances will challenge the American-led international system and contribute to the consolidation of multipolarity.

Excerpt

Developments in the first half of the year 2000 have further pushed China and Pakistan, on the one hand, and India and Russia, on the other, toward closer ties and cooperation. These states have all experienced major political or economic events with a significant long-term impact on their respective societies.

In Pakistan, a military coup removed Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif from office in late 1999 and ended the civilian rule in that country, characterized by political instability, economic mismanagement, and corruption. General Pervez Mosheriff, the commander of the armed forces who now rules the country, has refused to set a date for a return to a constitutional civilian government. The coup has further isolated Pakistan and weakened its economy, which is still suffering from the continued U.S.-led economic sanctions imposed on Pakistan and India when they declared their nuclear status in May 1998. The new Pakistani government has been under severe pressure to restore civilian rule not only on the part of the Commonwealth countries, but also of many Western countries, and in particular the United States. Economic sanctions and political pressure have created serious hardships for the Pakistanis, who require both foreign investments and loans and foreign

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