Issues in Philosophical Counseling

Issues in Philosophical Counseling

Issues in Philosophical Counseling

Issues in Philosophical Counseling

Synopsis

Raabe provides a detailed philosophical discussion as well as illustrative case studies of some of the most important issues encountered in any counseling practice. Particular attention is paid to the differences between how men and women communicate and how this is relevant to a counseling discussion, the role of medication in therapy, the concept of normalcy, the meaning of life, the motivation behind suicide, dream interpretation, and religious beliefs.

Excerpt

Since the publication of my first book I have received many e-mail messages and phone calls asking me about specific issues in philosophical counseling: Do you approve of counseling by e-mail? How should a philosophical counselor deal with a client who has been diagnosed as having a mental illness? What about the effects of prescription medication on a client? How do you respond when someone asks you, What is the meaning of life? Can you give me any advice on how to start a practice? and so on. I certainly don't claim to have the final answer to any of these questions but I know how hard it can be to find insights into them in the material that has been published in the field to date. There are also few suggestions and strategies for resolving the problems of everyday life in the writings of eminent philosophers who have concerned themselves primarily with hypothetical issues, trivial abstract analysis, and the development of grand philosophical systems. I therefore offer this volume as a starting point of philosophical inquiry into a number of common—perhaps even ordinary—but significant life issues, and as a companion to my first book.

While my book Philosophical Counseling: Theory and Practice dealt extensively with the theoretical underpinnings of the practice, the present volume focuses more on application. Some chapters were originally presented as papers at a conference of scholarly societies and associations whose doors were open to the general public, others were published in peer-reviewed professional journals, and still others were written specifically to instruct philosophical counselors in active practice. I hope that the easy readability and the largely nontheoretical orientation of these essays will make this book of interest not only to academics and practicing professionals but also to anyone not academically trained in philosophy and, even

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