The Handbook of Memory Disorders

The Handbook of Memory Disorders

The Handbook of Memory Disorders

The Handbook of Memory Disorders

Synopsis

The eagerly awaited 2nd edition of this classic handbook is a critical, thorough account of memory disorders relating to neurological processes and to developmental and acquired brain damage and presents comprehensive sections on theory, assessment, treatment and management of memory disorders. Written by a truly international team of experts, this completely updated edition offers an authoritative review of the key areas of research and development in this field. ¿ Completely updated and expanded ¿ New sections and chapters reflect many of the biggest growth areas in the field in recent years, such as confabulation, false memory and the frontal lobes ¿ Written by an international team of experts

Excerpt

Some 7 years ago, the First Edition of the Handbook of Memory Disorders was published. As editors, we hoped to summarize the substantial progress that had been made in understanding memory problems and in applying such knowledge to the assessment and treatment of memory-disordered patients. We hoped that the Handbook would provide a useful resource for our clinical colleagues and for the training of people entering the area. We approached what we regarded as an outstanding array of potential contributors and were delighted to find that they appeared to share our enthusiasm, producing some outstanding chapters. The resulting Handbook seems to have been very successful, not only in its primary aim but also in providing a valuable source for the wide range of people involved in memory research. The field has continued to be extremely active, resulting in a clear need for revision. Furthermore, our publishers were happy to extend the scope of an already substantial volume so as to allow coverage of these new developments.

The new edition differs from the original in a number of important ways. First of all, Fraser Watts, having moved out of the field, has relinquished his editorial role. His place has been taken by Michael Kopelman: our names are listed in alphabetical order, reflecting our joint and equal contributions to this volume. As on the first occasion, virtually every contributor we asked agreed to take part in the project, with those who participated in the first volume all preparing totally new chapters. In terms of content, we have kept most, but not all, of the original topics but have split some into two separate chapters, as in the case of visual and verbal short-term memory deficits, and Alzheimer's disease and subcortical dementia. Probably the most substantial change has been in our treatment of developmental memory disorders, where a single chapter has been replaced by a whole section, comprising an overview of the development of memory in normal children, chapters on specific memory disorders and on general learning disability, and finally a chapter on the assessment and treatment of children with memory problems. This change reflects the substantial growth of research in this area, together with the encouraging tendency for it to establish clear links with both mainstream cognitive psychology and research on memory deficits in adults. Another area that has been extremely active in recent years has been that linking executive deficits, often resulting from frontal lobe damage, to impaired memory performance. This line of development is reflected in chapters on the role of the frontal lobes in memory, on confabulation, and on the neuropsychological basis of false memory. The increased size of the volume has also allowed us to include chapters on developments in closely related areas. One of these includes a discussion of research on animals for the understanding of human memory disorders, while a second reviews the development of computational modelling approaches that are of relevance to the understanding of memory disorders. Finally, perhaps the most pervasive change within the field in recent years has been the great increase in the . . .

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