Companion to the History of Modern Science

Companion to the History of Modern Science

Companion to the History of Modern Science

Companion to the History of Modern Science

Synopsis

* A descriptive and analytical guide to the development of Western science from AD 1500, and to the diversity and course of that development first in Europe and later across the world* Presented in clear, non-technical language* Extensive indexes of Subjects and Names`Indeed a companion volume whose 67 essays give pleasure and instruction... an ambitious and successful work.' - Times Literary Supplement`This work is an essential resource for libraries everywhere. For specialist science libraries willing to keep just one encyclopaedic guide to history, for undergraduate libraries seeking to provide easily accessible information, for the devisers of university curricula, for the modern social historian or even the eclectic scientist taking a break from simply making history, this is the book for you.' - Times Higher Education Supplement`A pleasure to read with a carefully chosen typeface, well organized pages and ample margins ... it is very easy to find one's way around. This is a book which will be consulted widely.' - Technovation`This is a commendably easy book to use.' - British Journal of the History of Science`Scholars from other areas entering this field, students taking the vertical approach and teachers coming from any direction cannot fail to find this an invaluable text.' - History of Science Journal

Excerpt

This book concerns the momentous story of modern science as it has developed in the Western world since the Renaissance. The coverage is selective rather than comprehensive; the main goals are to show what a broad diversity of subjects comes within the history of science, and what a varied array of approaches historians of science are currently pursuing. We have explained in the Introduction how the volume is structured so as to serve these goals, and how it may answer to the interests of the general reader, as well as to the preoccupations of specialists in historical, philosophical, sociological and scientific fields.

The preparation and publication of this Companion traces to a proposal made by Jonathan Price of Routledge. From the beginning the intention of the publisher was to have a single volume, comprising substantial articles rather than entries in either encyclopedic or dictionary form. This intention was one that we, as editors, readily agreed was appropriate, given what was already available, given that a volume on the History of Technology was also being prepared by Routledge, and given what a wide readership would find most useful. To mark the departure from encyclopedic or dictionary forms, the title Companion was chosen; its usages seemed to provide precedents for several kinds of publication, including what we had in mind. The final scope and structuring of this book were then settled in discussions among the four of us and Jonathan Price as the publisher's representative. We are delighted that there is now this chance to extend our thanks to Jonathan Price for all he has done. It has been a great pleasure to join forces with him in producing this book. We give our thanks, likewise, to Mark Barragry of Routledge for his conscientious supervision of the production of the book.

We count ourselves very fortunate in having worked with two very able assistant editors. Early on Ros Thompson provided valuable aid, for which we are very grateful. The main burden has been taken up since by Laura Fransella, to whom we are greatly indebted for a most conscientious and congenial collaboration. The whole enterprise has depended decisively on her energy and . . .

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