International Sports Economics Comparisons

International Sports Economics Comparisons

International Sports Economics Comparisons

International Sports Economics Comparisons

Synopsis

This book brings together, for the first time under a single cover, international comparisons of the major topics in sports economics. Contributors are all renowned scholars of the international sports scene in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, the Pacific Rim, North America, and Europe. The reader will find an overview of sports in particular countries and regions along with comparisons along the major topics of economic importance. In particular, the contributions compare and contrast revenues and costs, labor markets (restrictions and discrimination), market structures (league and association organizations) and outcomes (team profitability and competitive balance), and policy issues (especially competition policy). Aimed primarily at sports scholars, practicing sports professionals, and policymakers, the volume is also well suited for undergraduate sports economics, sports management, and sports law courses.

Excerpt

Sports are a worldwide economic phenomenon. Around the world, institutions to govern them and organizations to run them vary significantly. The purpose of this volume is to shed light on this variation. It has also been our experience that economists gathering together from different lands typically spend the first few minutes simply catching up on the facts of institutions and organizations, and often the way in which they thought the world worked ends up being false. If this book accomplished nothing more than presenting the facts of international sports institutions and organizations, that would be enough. But, as readers will discover, it does much more than that. It has been our distinct pleasure to have had a hand in guiding this volume to completion. As editors, we offer just this brief preface since there is so much ground to cover.

The first four sections cover Western Europe, and the leadoff chapters set the tone for issues and comparisons. Bourg notes that the “European model” is an evolving policy choice. The originality and architecture of the European model are in danger, notably the aspects that distinguish it from the American model; that is, the primacy of the sports objective over the economic result. The chapter examines the challenges confronting European policy makers as they decide which economic model to apply to European sports into the future. Szymanski wonders if there even is such a thing as the “European model.” The European Commission suggests that there is a distinct European model of sport, and this chapter explores its existence by comparing European and U.S. institutionalized antitrust frameworks.

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