International Crisis and Domestic Politics: Major Political Conflicts in the 1980s

International Crisis and Domestic Politics: Major Political Conflicts in the 1980s

International Crisis and Domestic Politics: Major Political Conflicts in the 1980s

International Crisis and Domestic Politics: Major Political Conflicts in the 1980s

Synopsis

The essays collected in this volume examine the impact of international conflict on domestic politics in the 1980s. The findings expand upon previous crisis theories and put them into a cross-national context. Each essay presents a variant of the type of impact that international crises have on domestic politics. Students of international relations, comparative politics and political psychology will find a wealth of material in this text.

Excerpt

James W. Lamare

The chapters in this volume explore the impact of international crisis on domestic politics. When countries become politically entangled with each other, it is quite likely—although not inevitable—that the drama that unfolds upon the international stage will have some effect upon the internal politics of at least one of the disputing parties.

Reactions to external threat emanating from such conflicts have been indirectly explored by many scholars from diverse academic backgrounds, including anthropology, sociology, political science, and psychology (see, in review, Stein 1976). There is, for instance, a substantial body of evidence gathered from studies conducted in laboratory settings under experimental conditions showing that members of groups coalesce when they are under external threats to their security and well-being. Generalizing this consolidation effect to the real world of politics seems theoretically sensible, but has, nonetheless, proven empirically difficult (North 1962).

Many thorny methodological problems are involved in trying to track accurately domestic responses to threatening external stimuli. Collecting information in the right time sequence in order to gauge the impact of the crisis is sometimes more the result of fortuity than of planned research, especially given the unpredictability of the occurrence of international incidents. Analyzing the particular domestic effect of international conflict as part of a wider configuration of forces stemming from both international and domestic sources that might influence internal politics is often beyond the capabilities of even the most dedicated (and financially well-endowed) researcher.

Moreover, measuring the precise impact that an exogenous international encounter has upon the endogenous political processes varies according to

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.