Technological Issues in Broadcast Education: Critical Challenges

Technological Issues in Broadcast Education: Critical Challenges

Technological Issues in Broadcast Education: Critical Challenges

Technological Issues in Broadcast Education: Critical Challenges

Synopsis

The broadcasting industry's ongoing transition to digital technology raises significant questions for higher education, ones relating to appropriate curriculum design, the teacher/student relationship, legal issues, media convergence, and funding. This new collection of essays offers guidance to faculty, administrators, and scholars alike, offering innovative ideas on ways in which programs can excel in each area. In so doing, Technological Issues in Broadcast Education illuminates the educational settings that have been created and enhanced by the emergence of new broadcast-related technologies as well as the impact of these technologies on the missions of broadcasting programs.

Excerpt

This book literally started out over coffee. At the April 1999 Broadcast Education Association meeting, coeditors Donnelly and Blaney had gathered together a number of bea faculty to participate in a discussion of how technological considerations were impacting their mission. Data collected at this meeting and surveys of 234 bea institutional administrators resulted in a subsequent article (Blaney and Donnelly, 2000) about relationships between educational broadcast facilities and professional preparation, enrollment, alumni satisfaction, and faculty satisfaction. While informative, this study raised more questions in need of answers. As such, the faculty gathered in Las Vegas once again in 2000 and decided that an edited volume would serve the purpose of answering the disparate questions that arose from these conversations.

This book is a compilation of answers to those diverse questions. the chapters have one unifying purpose. They each seek to illuminate the educational settings that have been created and/or enhanced by the emergence of new broadcast-related technologies. in Chapter 1, W.A. Kelly Huff explains how the word “digital” has been incorporated into the broadcast educator's lexicon.

In Chapter 2, Matt Jenkins addresses the question of how the introduction of new technologies in broadcast education has created choices about how to teach certain skills in the changing technological environment. Moreover, he asks whether we are truly teaching anything new.

In a chapter sure to be of interest to administrators, Steve Craig discusses the perennial question of funding. Chapter 3 also offers the intriguing story of the use of student fees at the University of North Texas.

In Chapter 4, Jerry Condra addresses the boundaries of broadcast course work that new technologies have breached. Taking a larger snapshot, Gerard Donnelly asks similar questions about boundaries between academic departments in Chapter 5. in Chapter 6, Doug Sudhoff and Rick

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.