Success Factors of Young African American Women at a Historically Black College

Success Factors of Young African American Women at a Historically Black College

Success Factors of Young African American Women at a Historically Black College

Success Factors of Young African American Women at a Historically Black College

Synopsis

A companion to the author's Success Factors of Young African American Males (1998), this volume contains case studies of young African American women. The young women share their experiences and insights and show how they have overcome considerable obstacles and persevered in obtaining a college education at an historically black college.

Excerpt

Within the context of American culture and history, I will address the complex lives of black women in America. In my research published as Success Factors of Young African American Males at a Historically Black College (1998), I discovered that the success stories of the young men I studied were the result of a strong mother and/or grandmother who were the backbone and lifeline of the family. The literature acknowledges that black women have had the heaviest burden to bear within the African American community. If we contemplate the history of African American women from the period of slavery, we can easily claim that they have endured the greatest suffering of any group of people in American history. African American women should be studied within the context of their silent suffering and courageous overcoming.

As an English professor, I have learned that the feelings and experiences of people are best communicated by the people themselves. Therefore, we need to “hear” about yesterday through the “voices” of the past. In researching the experiences of black women during and after the time of slavery, I discovered that A.J. Cooper (1892), in A Voice from the South, expressed the same thought:

that muffled chord, the one mute and voiceless note has been the sadly expectant Black Woman.… The “other side” has not been represented by one who “lives there.” And not many can more sensibly realize and more accurately tell the weight and the fret of the “long dull pain” than the open-eyed but hitherto voiceless Black Woman of America. (pp. 1,2) . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.