Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development: State-of-the-Art Lessons for Practice

Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development: State-of-the-Art Lessons for Practice

Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development: State-of-the-Art Lessons for Practice

Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development: State-of-the-Art Lessons for Practice

Synopsis

Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development--the twelfth volume in the Professional Practice Series--is a hands-on resource that offers practitioners a compendium of the most- current theory and research concerning training and organizations. This important book takes a multidisciplinary approach and contains chapters from leading practitioners and researchers who provide state-of-the-art information, suggestions, principles, and guidelines from a wide range of disciplines. Contributors to Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development Kenneth G. Brown C. Shawn Burke Janis A. Cannon-Bowers Donna Chrobot-Mason Jason A. Colquitt David A. DuBois J. Kevin Ford John Jeppesen Kurt Kraiger M. Anthony Machin Raymond A. Noe Colleen Petersen David B. Peterson Miguel A. Quinones Linda Rogers Eduardo Salas Scott Tannenbaum

Excerpt

What a difference a decade makes! From the early 1960s until the late 1980s, training research lay largely dormant. Reviewers for the Annual Review of Psychology habitually characterized the research as atheoretical, uninspiring, or virtually nonexistent (for example, Goldstein, 1980; Campbell, 1971; Latham, 1988; Wexley, 1984). Latham (1988) summarized the state of the art in the late 1980s as follows: “It may become a tradition in this journal for the authors of the chapter on training and development to lament … the lack of attention to theory and the lack of research influencing practice evident in the practitioner literature on this topic” (pp. 545–546). Early on, Campbell also noted that research tended to compare new and old training methods, rather than attempt to advance our knowledge of how learning needs should be diagnosed, addressed through training, or evaluated. Goldstein and Sorcher's (1974) and Decker's research (Decker & Nathan, 1985) on behavioral modeling might well represent the best in theory development and research during the 1970s and 1980s.

In contrast, the past decade has seen an unprecedented level of activity. There have been new theories or models of training evaluation and transfer of training, broader systems thinking with respect to training effectiveness, and at the close of the decade, a transition from traditional instructor-led models to exciting new applications of e-learning such as Web-based training and virtual reality training. Indeed, in their Annual Review chapter, Salas and Cannon-Bowers (2001) refer to the 1990s as the decade of progress and pronounce the training research patient healthy. It is interesting to consider what might have accounted for the decade long surge in interest in training theory and application.

I believe that much of the credit goes to three influential papers appearing between 1985 and 1989. First, as part of his dissertation, Ray Noe developed a general model of training effectiveness . . .

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