Regional Institutions and Governance in the European Union

Regional Institutions and Governance in the European Union

Regional Institutions and Governance in the European Union

Regional Institutions and Governance in the European Union

Synopsis

European integration has profoundly changed the relationship between national and subnational governments and has led to the emergence of the "Europe of the Regions." This edited volume highlights some of the problems involved in the integration of the three main levels of governance in the European Union: the regional, national, and supranational level. The contributors address recent developments in various regions and examine the way these regions have adjusted to the growing importance of the European Union's multilevel governance system. Among the issues discussed are the emergence and institutionalization of new regional political systems, such as those of Scotland, Wales, and Flanders; the channels available to the regions for influencing the EU policy process in relation to their constituencies; and horizontal projects of integration among regions, which make the whole multilevel governance system more flexible as well as more complex.

Excerpt

The origins of this book go back to a workshop titled “European Public Policy for Regional Policy Makers” held at the Staff House of the University of Hull September 15-16, 2000. the workshop was funded by the Intensive Program subsection of the Socrates program and its purpose was to bring together scholars and students to discuss the recent devolution processes in the United Kingdom in a comparative perspective. Several Ph.D. and M.A. students from our partner institutions were invited to take part in this workshop. Alison Woodward, Linze Schaap, Karen Celis, and Wouter-Jan Oosten became important contributors to this volume. I want to thank them for their continuing support.

Eight of the chapters collected in this volume are high-quality versions of papers presented at the workshop at Hull. the chapters by Elisa Roller and Amanda Sloat comparing Scotland and Catalonia and by Susan Hodgett and Elizabeth Meehan on Northern Ireland were included at a later stage and were written specifically for this volume.

I am also grateful for the academic support of Charlie Jeffery, who made the effort to come to Hull during a period when the United Kingdom had to cope with the fuel crisis and was close to a standstill. He not only encouraged the participants to take part in the England Social Research Council (ESRC) Devolution program, of which he is the director, but he also presented an interesting paper at the workshop. Barry Jones, Graham Pearce, Norman O'Neill, Alex Wright, and Charlie

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