Reading Development in Chinese Children

Reading Development in Chinese Children

Reading Development in Chinese Children

Reading Development in Chinese Children

Synopsis

This text reviews both similarities and unique cultural, linguistic, and script differences of Chinese relative to alphabetic reading, and even across Chinese regions. Chinese reading acquisition relies upon children's strongly developing analytic skills, as highlighted here. These 16 chapters present state-of-the-art research on diverse aspects of Chinese children's reading development.

Excerpt

Catherine McBride-Chang and Hsuan-Chih Chen

We are pleased to offer this compendium of articles on various aspects of reading development in Chinese children from diverse parts of the Chinese-reading world. Although there are already books devoted to the topic of Chinese literacy-development in cities in Mainland China (e.g., Ingulsrud & Allen, 1999; Li, Gaffney, & Packard, 2002), ours is the first to survey research on Chinese reading-development across Chinese-reading societies. As we hope will become increasingly clear as readers peruse the following chapters, there are many aspects of reading-development in Chinese that simply do not exist in Englishreading societies, where the vast majority of the research in reading development has been carried out thus far. Many of the most important issues related to Chinese reading-development have no straightforward parallel in English or other alphabetic orthographies.

Most of the chapters in this book rely, either explicitly or implicitly, on the English-reading literature to help explain reading development and/or impairment in Chinese. Yet any differences among Australian, British, or North American English readers in dialects spoken, scripts to be read, or even the teaching of reading itself are surely small compared with those encountered by Chinese readers from different regions. The extent of diversity among Chinese learners in approaches to literacy instruction is highlighted by Cheung and Ng (chapter 1 in this volume). For example, it is not at all uncommon to find two fluent Chinese readers who can read the same script but cannot orally communicate with one another because their spoken languages are so different from each other (Chen, 2001). Only as the small body of research on Chinese children's reading develops further will researchers understand the extent to which diversities in Chinese societies may impact Chinese children's literacy acquisition. This volume is a step toward documenting some of the commonalities and differences in reading-development experiences across Chinese societies.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.