Strategic Management Methodology: Generally Accepted Principles for Practitioners

Strategic Management Methodology: Generally Accepted Principles for Practitioners

Strategic Management Methodology: Generally Accepted Principles for Practitioners

Strategic Management Methodology: Generally Accepted Principles for Practitioners

Synopsis

Strategic planning methodology is the application of strategic management theory to practice. This book is about the process of strategic management in action, and is firmly grounded, unlike many works on the subject, in both strategic management theory and empirical research. This is what planning professionals and strategic management scholars have long sought--a firm methodological connection between strategic management theory and its daily practice in management.

Excerpt

This book was written for the commercial planning profession—the community of management professionals who form, facilitate, and manage procedures for selecting corporate and business objectives; developing strategy and plans of business, and facilitating strategy implementation. Nearly every sizeable business in America prepares a formal plan of business. In each such business, at least one manager is responsible for overseeing the firm's planning procedures. This book is intended to be a source of methodological guidance for those managers.

The focus of this text is on practice—how planning functions best are performed administratively. There is an abundance of theoretical writing and empirical research into topics pertaining to business and corporate strategy. But, surprisingly little definitive information is available to guide professional planning managers or senior executives in selecting the procedural principles most likely to produce plans that can be implemented successfully in the specific circumstances of their firms. This book is intended to fill that void.

In this volume, the planning manager will find a collection of methodological principles that are “generally accepted” for one of three reasons. First, their effectiveness may have been demonstrated empirically, either by formal research or case histories. Second, academicians may be in general agreement on the practical application of strategic management theory. Third, even if empirical evidence or relevant theory are unavailable, a pattern of customary practice may have evolved. In the absence of those foundations, I have drawn on three decades of

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