Dyslexia: A Practitioner's Handbook

Dyslexia: A Practitioner's Handbook

Dyslexia: A Practitioner's Handbook

Dyslexia: A Practitioner's Handbook

Synopsis

This new edition of an extremely successful practitioner's handbook incorporates the many changes in the definition and assessment of dyslexia and in educational policy (including some new legislation) that have taken place since the second edition was published in 1998. Completely revised and updated throughout, there are also new chapters covering learning styles, secondary school aspects, and dyslexia throughout the lifespan. Covers recent reports and legislation teachers and policy makers need to know about Provides practical material on instruction and teaching Written by an internationally well-known author Praise for the Second Edition: "...I found the handbook practical, readable, concise and an invaluable resource." Frederika Ritherdon, Principal SEN Officer, Bolton LEA "Your books are in hot demand from the library". Angie Silbery Shoji, CEO, Specific Learning Disabilities Association, New Zealand

Excerpt

In 1998, when writing the preface for the second edition of the Practitioner's Handbook,I suggested that a revised edition was necessary at that time because of the increased activity in research and practice in dyslexia. If that was the case in 1998 it certainly is the case today. The Fifth British Dyslexia Association International Conference drew its largest audience to date in April 2001 with delegates from over 38 countries and the International Dyslexia Association Conference held each year in the USA now regularly draws around 3000 delegates. This burgeoning interest in the field is also reflected in the two major conferences devoted to multilingualism and dyslexia held in the UK and the USA in 1999 and 2002, respectively. Additionally, the European-wide interest in dyslexia, assisted by organizations such as the European Dyslexia Association (EDA), is constantly increasing with a considerable amount coming from central and eastern Europe. Therefore, the inception of the first European-wide dyslexia awareness week in 2002 and the first EDA All European Conference on Dyslexia in Budapest in 2004 comes as no surprise. In addition to those events mentioned above there have been successful local, national and other international events in dyslexia run by education authorities, voluntary organisations, such as parents' organisations, and professional societies. All have contributed to the developments in teacher training, assessment and teaching materials, and interest in research. This has resulted in an increased awareness and enhanced professionalism of those involved in the area of dyslexia.

These developments have certainly been evident in the UK at local as well as national level. Many education authorities have produced policy and documentation on dyslexia. Additionally, working party enquiries into dyslexia and psychological assessment, and assessment and support in further and higher education for students with dyslexia have taken place. There has also been government-led task group investigations into practice in dyslexia both in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland in 2001 and 2002. The chapter on international perspectives (Chapter 15) highlights other examples of government initiatives throughout Europe, New Zealand and the USA. These are only a few of the many initiatives worldwide (which would in themselves occupy the best part of a book) in dyslexia.

At the Fifth International BDA conference the chairperson Professor Rod Nicolson called for further collaboration among all professionals and parents working in the field and the need for multidisciplinary co-operation, he suggested, was paramount. This is in fact particularly important given the breadth of perspectives now incorporated into the different areas that relate to dyslexia.

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