Telecommunications Management: Industry Structures and Planning Strategies

Telecommunications Management: Industry Structures and Planning Strategies

Telecommunications Management: Industry Structures and Planning Strategies

Telecommunications Management: Industry Structures and Planning Strategies

Synopsis

With today's communications industry experiencing major changes on an almost daily basis, media managers must have a clear understanding of the different delivery platforms, as well as a grasp of critical management, planning, and economic factors in order to stay current and move their organizations forward. Telecommunications Management helps current and future media professionals understand the relationship and convergence patterns between the broadcast, cable television, telephony, and Internet communication industries. Author Richard A. Gershon examines telecommunications industry structures and the management practices and business strategies affecting the delivery of information and entertainment services to consumers. He brings in specialists to present the finer points of management and planning responsibilities. Case studies from the International Radio and Television Society (IRTS) competition supplement the main text and offer an invaluable perspective on management issues. Developed for students in telecommunications management, electronic media management, and telecommunication economics, this volume also serves as a practical reference for the professional manager.

Excerpt

I finished the first draft of this book at 4:45 p.m. on December 31, 1999. This book is about the future. The clear lines and historic boundaries that once separated broadcasting, cable, telephone, and Internet communication are becoming less distinct. A natural convergence of industries and information technologies are blurring those distinctions. The main driving force behind such convergence is the digitalization of media and information technology. Tomorrow's media and telecommunications companies are attempting to offer the strategic goal of one-stop shopping, whereby customers will be offered a whole host of software products via an electronic supermarket to the home. The 21st century promises a very different set of industry players than was the case in past years. The future will allow for the full integration of voice data and video services and give new meaning to the term programming.

A Word about Curriculum Planning

Designing curriculum is very similar to being a software engineer. The information contained in a book on telecommunications management can become quickly dated (or worse irrelevant) when educators and the materials they use become static. The best software designers (and companies) routinely challenge themselves and ask whether they are making the kinds of products and services that their customers will want in the future. The field . . .

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