Handbook of Instructional Practices for Literacy Teacher-Educators: Examples and Reflections from the Teaching Lives of Literacy Scholars

Handbook of Instructional Practices for Literacy Teacher-Educators: Examples and Reflections from the Teaching Lives of Literacy Scholars

Handbook of Instructional Practices for Literacy Teacher-Educators: Examples and Reflections from the Teaching Lives of Literacy Scholars

Handbook of Instructional Practices for Literacy Teacher-Educators: Examples and Reflections from the Teaching Lives of Literacy Scholars

Synopsis

This volume offers a unique glimpse into the teaching approaches and thinking of a wide range of well-known literacy researchers, and the lessons they have learned from their own teaching lives. The contributors teach in a variety of universities, programs, and settings. Each shares an approach he or she has used in a course, and introduces the syllabus for this course through personal reflections that give the reader a sense of the theories, prior experiences, and influential authors that have shaped their own thoughts and approaches. In addition to describing the nature of their students and the program in which the course is taught, many authors also share key issues with which they have grappled over the years while teaching their course; others discuss considerations that were relevant during the preparation of this particular syllabus or describe how it evolved in light of student input. The book is organized by areas within literacy education: reading; English/language arts; literature; emergent literacy; content-area literacy; literacy assessment and instruction; literacy and technology; and inquiries into literacy, theory, and classroom practice. It is accompanied by an interactive Web site: http://msit.gsu.edu/handbook. This online resource provides additional information about the authors' courses including complete syllabi, recommended readings, grading rubrics, and sample assignments. Readers are invited to respond and contribute their own syllabi and teaching experiences to the discourse generated by the volume.

Excerpt

At first glance, being a researcher in literacy education may seem to require that a person lead two lives, those of a researcher and a teacher. in any given semester, we immerse ourselves in inquiry and we teach, prepare conference proposals and give feedback to our students, reflect on our data and prepare for class, make conference handouts and support students' learning in field experience settings, edit research manuscripts and evaluate student portfolios, and then we leave for conferences. When we arrive at conferences, it may appear that many of us take time out from juggling our research/teaching hats and take the opportunity to foreground our research selves. For days, we immerse ourselves in learning what colleagues have done in their lives as researchers. We stay up late into the night talking about ideas we heard in sessions, articles we are writing, or new inquiries we are planning. Hearing about each other's research invigorates us and we often leave for home exhilarated, our brains electric with the impulses of possibilities. Arriving back at our universities, it may seem that we resume our split personalities and begin again the balancing act with our two loves, research and teaching. However, for the literacy scholars who have agreed to contribute to this volume, the split between research and teaching is actually a false dichotomy. We return from conferences pondering how we might incorporate ideas we have heard into our next semester's syllabus. We contemplate how our colleagues' findings might relate to the problems our student teachers are having. We reconsider how the content of our courses might be revised to be more consistent with our increased understanding of how literacy develops. in such ways, our teaching reflects our scholarship. Our research and teaching lives intertwine.

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