Organization and Management in the Embrace of Government

Organization and Management in the Embrace of Government

Organization and Management in the Embrace of Government

Organization and Management in the Embrace of Government

Synopsis

Organization and Management in the Embrace of Government is an original exploration of how governments affect the ways people organize themselves, manage those organizations, and respond to the organizations thus created. It is a grounded theory of how governments that are weak, erratic, or hostile undermine complex organization, trust, meritocracy, commitment, and other implicit expectations about how organizations operate. Scholars, students, and all those interested in a better understanding of how governments affect our cultural expectations of one another, our organizations, and the economies based upon them will find this groundbreaking volume to be a rich resource. The author, President-Elect of the Academy of Management, distills original comparative data drawn from China, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, and the United States to paint a coherent theory of the organizational effects of governments. The book has been written primarily to introduce organizational and governmental scholars to the ways that governments can influence organization and management. However, it also is written with an eye to readers with practical interests in international management or governments. This pioneering work will be discussed and analyzed for decades to come.

Excerpt

Jone Pearce opens her last chapter with the words, ”Governments are critical to understanding organizations, not just because they may impose a regulation or tax that increases costs, but because they establish the framework on which all organizations are built. This is a framework with both direct and indirect consequences for these organizations and their participants.” This concluding thought makes a great introduction as well. We too believe that our field has paid too little attention to the political and economic context of organizations as we have developed and tested our theories about them. Jone Pearce at once calls attention to this lacuna and fills it. Drawing on her years of quantitative and qualitative research in emerging economies and her comprehensive reading over those years, we are treated here to a timely (and we suspect, timeless) treatment of these issues. Her contributions are many. For example, you will find yourself intrigued by some nonobvious insights about personal relationships at work. Her lively writing style only adds to our reading pleasure. We hope you will enjoy this book as much as we did.

—Arthur Brief —James P. Walsh . . .

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