Linking Reading Assessment to Instruction: An Application Worktext for Elementary Classroom Teachers

Linking Reading Assessment to Instruction: An Application Worktext for Elementary Classroom Teachers

Linking Reading Assessment to Instruction: An Application Worktext for Elementary Classroom Teachers

Linking Reading Assessment to Instruction: An Application Worktext for Elementary Classroom Teachers

Synopsis

This worktext applies current theory to classroom practice by providing, in each chapter, a brief explanation of major concepts followed by guided practical experience in administering, scoring, and interpreting reading assessment techniques. Like the popular previous editions, the third edition: *emphasizes the use of assessment and diagnosis for instructional decision making--rather than for simply giving grades; *stresses the use of informal assessment techniques--reflecting the current emphasis in educational assessment theories--but also includes coverage of standardized test scores; *provides both classroom-tested results and interpretations of the data, giving students step-by-step experience in administering, scoring, and interpreting assessment techniques; and *includes numerous "hands-on" activity worksheets. The recent U.S. National Reading Panel report found that, for children to be good readers, they must be taught phonemic awareness, phonics skills, how to read fluently, and how to apply comprehension strategies. Linking Reading Assessment to Instruction: An Application Worktext for Elementary Classroom Teachers, Third Edition, covers all four areas. It is appropriate for undergraduate or graduate reading methods courses that include a diagnosis component, reading diagnosis courses, exceptional education courses, and in-service courses on reading/literacy development. Changes in the third edition include: *thorough updating throughout the text; *new activities on standardized tests, running records, and metacognitive comprehension, and; reorganized sections on using standardized test scores and story retelling. An Instructor's Manual is available upon adoption.

Excerpt

Linking Reading Assessment to Instruction—a worktext for individuals who are or intend to be teachers—reflects our cumulative efforts at preparing teachers for the classroom. Over the years we have been teaching reading methods, reading diagnosis, and corrective reading courses, we have found that many of the texts we use with our students provide excellent information on a theoretical level, but few offer adequate practice activities in instructional and assessment techniques appropriate for the elementary classroom. We decided to write this text to make these kinds of application activities widely available. It is intended as a supplement to be used along with the “standard” texts normally used in pre-service or in-service courses.

In deciding to produce a third edition of this worktext, we were guided by our desire to ensure that we were continuing to meet the needs of elementary teachers. Assessment trends today demand that teachers be prepared to use classroom assessments to provide the best and most appropriate instruction for every child. As students go through this book, they will experience the world of decision making in teaching and have many opportunities to engage in making decisions of their own. A major premise of this book is that instructional decision making is critical to effective teaching practices—and that classroom teachers must be knowledgeable in various types of formal and informal assessment techniques, appropriate methods for collecting data, and ways to accurately interpret that data in order to make sound decisions. We believe our worktext provides the opportunities needed to prepare teachers for the vitally important work of instructional decision making.

As we searched for ways to support and extend the theory and concepts presented in college-level reading methods and reading diagnosis textbooks, we often discussed with our students and colleagues the different activities we developed. We learned that the most effective activities are those that mirror most closely the realities of the elementary-level classroom.

As with the second edition, we retained activities our colleagues told us were helpful, added a few new ones and deleted those which we considered not as challenging. All of the activities, as in the first and second editions, have been field tested. The assessments have been used with elementary students and most of the data used in the activities come from actual case studies.

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