Leadership for Educational Renewal: Developing a Cadre of Leaders

Leadership for Educational Renewal: Developing a Cadre of Leaders

Leadership for Educational Renewal: Developing a Cadre of Leaders

Leadership for Educational Renewal: Developing a Cadre of Leaders

Synopsis

From the AgAnda for Education in a Democracy SeriesSponsored by the National Network for Educational RenewalIntroduction by John I. Goodlad This volume from the AgAnda for Education in a Democracy series introduces the four-part mission that guides the National Network for Educational Renewal's agAnda:Enculturate the young in a democracyEnsure access to knowledge for all studentsProvide caring and effective pedagogyExercise responsible stewardship of schoolsUsing real-life case examples from an innovative national leadership program and its local and regional affiliates, the authors demonstrate why effective leadership is essential to advancing this vital agAnda and how leadership capacity and commitment can be cultivated. From curriculum to evaluation, this important guide outlines the core concepts and winning strategies for building leadership skills in school administrators, teachers, teacher educators, and other university faculty.

Excerpt

In 1894, a young Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed, “There are two gospels which should be preached to every reformer. The first is the gospel of morality; the second is the gospel of efficiency.” The interplay of efficiency and morality in human institutions, particularly in the educational institutions we call schools, continues to intrigue. On the surface, both morality and efficiency are good; morality denotes fairness, virtue, and good conduct, among other things, and efficiency bespeaks a high level of achievement or production with a minimal expenditure of effort, money, or time. Ideally, our schools, our governments, our places of employment, even our families would be both moral and efficient in their own ways.

Difficulties arise, however, when we attempt to move beyond generalizations to specifics. What is morality? Who decides? Philosophers far wiser than I have spent lifetimes trying to convince themselves and others that there are or there are not definitive answers to those brief but complex questions. How can efficiency be judged? What are the criteria? Again the questions point to no single, certain answers. Moreover, inefficiencies have frequently been imposed on human institutions in the name of efficiency, and immoralities promulgated in the name of morality. When we advance to another level of specificity and consider morality and efficiency in the schools, the questions not only retain their complexity but also become very personal and deadly serious: Should my child's school teach morality?

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