From Nuremberg to the Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice

From Nuremberg to the Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice

From Nuremberg to the Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice

From Nuremberg to the Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice

Synopsis

This collection is based on a lecture series organized jointly by Matrix Chambers and the Wiener Library in London between April and June 2002. Leading experts present papers examining the evolution of international criminal justice from its origins at Nuremberg through to the proliferation of international courts and tribunals based at The Hague today. The lectures will provide various perspectives on the subject for anyone interested in international criminal law--from specialists to non-specialists.

Excerpt

On 17 July 1998, a United Nations Diplomatic Conference adopted the Statute for the International Criminal Court. This was the culmination of a process begun at Nuremberg in the aftermath of the Second World War and leading to the creation of a permanent international tribunal which would have jurisdiction over the most serious international crimes.

Three months later, on 16 October 1998, Senator Augusto Ugarte Pinochet, the former President of Chile, was arrested in London pursuant to a request for his extradition to Spain to face charges for crimes against humanity which had occurred while he was head of state in Chile. This marked the first time a former head of state had been arrested in England on such charges, and it was followed by legal proceedings which confirmed that he was not entitled to claim immunity from the juris diction of the English courts for crimes which were governed by an applicable international convention.

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