The Performing School: Managing, Teaching, and Learning in a Performance Culture

The Performing School: Managing, Teaching, and Learning in a Performance Culture

The Performing School: Managing, Teaching, and Learning in a Performance Culture

The Performing School: Managing, Teaching, and Learning in a Performance Culture

Synopsis

This specially commissioned collection of perspectives offers an analysis of the new organisation of the teaching profession - reconstructed around the notion of performance and the implications of a performance culture. The Performing School examines the roots, directions and implications of the new structure by drawing together insights from policy, research and practice at this time of rapid change and debate. This unique volume addresses three interconnected issues of modernisation and education: *what is the background to and significance of performance management in modernising schools and teachers at the present time? *what are the likely future effects of a performance culture on teaching, learning and schooling? *what will it take to ensure that performance management improves pedagogy and professionality beyond the narrow confines of performativity, managerialism and market reform in education?

Excerpt

The stakes are high. Throughout the world governments are attempting to reform their education systems in the face of national and global change. in many advanced industrial societies, where both economic and natural resources are in decline, investing in human capital now constitutes a central platform of economic and education reform (Coleman, 1988). As governments increasingly articulate the rhetoric of a 'knowledge economy', traditional cultures and organisational structures for teaching are found to be wanting. the drive to improve indicators of educational performance, and to ensure that teachers are equipped and able to operate in rapidly changing professional environments, is leading to attempts to reorganise, reskill and reculture teaching. in some reform programmes the focus is on new forms of professional qualification, in others it is on flexibility and marketisation. a common thread in many, especially western, reforms is the increasing focus on the performance of schools, on the capacity of headteachers to measure that performance and on holding teachers more directly accountable for it through both rewards and sanctions. the idea of market performance and finance-driven education reform is not entirely new and, in the uk, has its origins in the 1988 Education Reform Act (ERA) and subsequent initiatives linking inspection, target-setting, league tables and performance management (Bridges and McLaughlin, 1994; Bridges and Husbands, 1996).

This book examines the Labour government's ambitions and extensive plans for the reform of the uk teaching profession set out in the Green Paper entitled 'Teachers: Meeting the Challenge of Change' (DfEE, 1998). New Labour won the 1997 election, famously, on a declaration that its three main priorities were 'education, education, education'. in the preface to the Green Paper, Tony Blair declared that 'the teaching profession is critical to our mission. First rate teachers and headteachers are indispensable to giving our children the best possible start in life'. the Green Paper developed the government's perception of what it

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