Television Studies: The Key Concepts

Television Studies: The Key Concepts

Television Studies: The Key Concepts

Television Studies: The Key Concepts

Synopsis

Television Studies: The Key Concepts is the definitive reference guide to an area of rapidly expanding academic interest. Among those aspects of television studies covered in this comprehensive and up-to-date guide are:* theoretical perspectives which have shaped the study of television - Marxism; semiology; feminism* concepts which have shaped the study of television - narrative; representation; bias* television genres - soap opera; news; science fiction* methods used for understanding television - content analysis; audience research* relevant social, economic and political phenomena - ownership; social policy.

Excerpt

Even though a generation has grown up with it, television is still a comparatively new technology. Even in the context of the authors' own lives we have a lucid sense of its novelty. Some of us dimly remember a single channel of British television. Most of us recollect just two channels. Virtually all of us can recall black and white television. And every one of us can remember the advent of the video-cassette recorder, even if we have not yet mastered the knack of setting it for when we will be out. In the last few years the terrain has been altering dramatically with a mushrooming of channels, interactive viewing, compact discs, internet links and other innovations that tax our imaginations.

Television is also enormously significant. In more developed societies virtually every household possesses at least one television, with ownership of a set per member becoming increasingly commonplace. Television viewing has become the dominant leisure activity for the majority of the population, with statistics suggesting that each individual in the UK watches television, on average, for nearly three hours a day, while in the US research has suggested that sets may be on for an average of seven hours (Macionis and Plummer, 1998). Although ownership in Asia and Latin America lags behind comparatively, these continents and that of Africa have already been targeted as the major areas of growth for the global television industry during the twenty-first century Beyond these bare statistics, though, television plays a central role in most people's everyday lives. In the public sphere it has become the venue for political debate, religious evangelism and the exchange of 'news', as well as the major medium for entertainment (Macionis and Plummer, 1998). In the private realm, television has been seen both as a quasi-altar around which the family gathers and the harbinger of domestic fragmentation as everybody slopes off to different rooms to watch their own favoured

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.