Tourism in the Age of Globalisation

Tourism in the Age of Globalisation

Tourism in the Age of Globalisation

Tourism in the Age of Globalisation

Synopsis

This book contributes to the clarification and systemization of modern notions of tourism, examining the trend of globalization to provide a review of contemporary tourism challenges.

Excerpt

Tourism is one of the most international of industries, with both the public and private sectors increasingly concerned with issues of international competitiveness and benchmarking. This is no less so for domestic tourism where international standards are derived for service delivery and facilities - indeed in destinations such as the former Eastern European states, international benchmarks have been used to drive-up the standards and the quality of the domestic industry. Yet despite the obvious international focus of tourism from a geographical point of view, rather less attention has been given to the process of internationalisation in the tourism sector - both from a government and an industry viewpoint. It was for this reason that Salah Wahab perceived the need for a book drawing together leading authors to provide a state of the art review of the process of globalisation and its consequences for the various sectors of tourism. Since 1997, when the book was first mooted, the need for such a volume has become more acute as globalisation has begun to rival sustainability as an organising concept for the way we approach tourism.

We have organised this book into four parts. The first part sets the scene in terms of an introduction to globalisation and tourism by ourselves, followed by Hall and Fayos-Solà and Bueno's overview of global trends of territoriality, economic integration and tourism policy. In the second part, the authors focus on the impact of globalisation upon tourism demand, in particular the new tourist and the consequences of globalisation for both tourism promotion and the distribution system. It is clear from these chapters by Buhalis, Seaton and Alford and Vanhove that it is in the area of tourism demand that globalisation has, to date, had the most impact. In the third part, the chapters focus on elements of competitiveness and their relationship with globalisation. These elements comprise the destination itself (Swarbrooke), the role of alliances and mergers (Go and Appelman), education (Baum), safety and security (Santana), and quality management (Lee-Ross and Johns). The authors in this section disagree as to the impact of globalisation on tourism, with a consensus that perhaps the consequences for tourism are not yet felt to the same degree as in other sectors of the economy. In the fourth part the chapters review issues of sustainability in

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