The Psychology of Intelligence

The Psychology of Intelligence

The Psychology of Intelligence

The Psychology of Intelligence

Excerpt

A book on the "Psychology of Intelligence" could cover half the realm of psychology. The following pages are confined to outlining one view, that based on the formation of "operations," and to determining as objectively as possible its place among others which have been put forward. The first task is to define intelligence in relation to adaptive processes in general (Chap. 1), then to show, by examining the "psychology of thought", that the act of intelligence consists essentially in "grouping" operations according to certain definite structures (Chap. 2). Then, if intelligence is thus conceived as the form of equilibrium towards which all cognitive processes tend, there arises the problem of its relations with perception (Chap. 3), and with habit (Chap. 4); as well as the question of its development (Chap. 5) and of its socialization (Chap. 6).

In spite of the abundance and the value of well-known studies, the psychological theory of intellectual mechanisms is only in its infancy, and we are barely beginning to glimpse the sort of precision of which it might be capable. It is this

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