A History of Ireland: From Earliest Times to 1922

A History of Ireland: From Earliest Times to 1922

A History of Ireland: From Earliest Times to 1922

A History of Ireland: From Earliest Times to 1922

Synopsis

Edmund Curtis's remarkable survey of Ireland, from its earliest origins to the twentieth century, is a classic introduction to Ireland's fascinating history. Reaching from St Patrick's Mission in 432 to the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1922, this authoritative text explores the formative events of Ireland's past and encompasses the Norman invasion, Gaelic recovery, Cromwell's Settlement, the Act of Union, and the Great Famine.Lucid and scholarly, this all-embracing account unfolds the events of Ireland's history and the story of its people, through an examination of their political, religious, social, economic and cultural past. Ireland's unique history is revealed here through the 'moving forces, the deciding facts, and the men who mattered'.Featuring a chronology of key dates in Irish history and a guideline to the pronunciation of Irish names, this celebrated narrative now includes a new introduction by Sean Duffy.

Excerpt

by Seán Duffy

Without having subjected the matter to extensive bibliographical analysis, I would venture the observation that few countries - irrespective of size, population and 'importance' (however one cares to measure it) - have had more single-volume surveys of their history written than has Ireland. At any one time there are literally dozens of them in print and they sell like the proverbial hot cake, frequently in inverse proportion to their merit (the compulsion to write a history of Ireland being irresistibly attractive to those least qualified for the task). Demand by the readership of such works is outstripped only by publishers' clamour for new additions to the collection, but, although the shelves of libraries and bookshops are groaning under the weight of general narratives, those who practise the trade of Irish history find it very hard to recommend any one work that will cover all. Even works by professional historians which claim to survey the story of Ireland from earliest times to the present often do a grave injustice to their subject. Apart from the fact that sorties into medieval Ireland by modern historians have not infrequently proved disastrous (if unintentionally hilarious), more importantly, the latter understandably believes that the history of modern Ireland is what really matters. Hence, although the dawn of Irish history comes with the introduction of the written word 1,600 years ago, it is not unusual for a 'general' history of Ireland to cover the first fourteen centuries of its history in as many pages, while giving over the equivalent of a page, or even two, to each of the last 200 years.

A general history of Ireland that does justice to medieval and modern alike, I would suggest, is therefore more likely to come from the pen of a medievalist. And few among the latter can compare with the late Edmund Curtis. Curtis led an extraordinary life. Born at Bury in Lancashire in 1881, his parents were of Irish Protestant extraction, his father a Donegal man, his mother from

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.