Drift-- Migrancy and Architecture

Drift-- Migrancy and Architecture

Drift-- Migrancy and Architecture

Drift-- Migrancy and Architecture

Synopsis

The contributors to this volume inspects the intersections between architectures of place and flows of migrancy. It is an exploration of the often complex and unorthodox modes of dwelling that are emerging precisely from within the ruins of the idea of place.

Excerpt

This collection began its life as a conference held in Melbourne in 1997. This conference - with its rather intricate title Building Dwelling Drifting: migrancy and the limits of architecture - was the third in a series of four (to date) organized by members of the 'Other Connections' group. It was preceded by conferences in Singapore (1993) and Chandigarh (1995), and was followed by another in Beirut (1999). The intellectual agenda of the group was unique in the field of architecture for its interest in postcolonial criticism as a means of provincializing and displacing dominant Western conceptions of architecture and urbanism. Each conference in the series was committed to a situated discussion of particular postcolonial questions. So by staging the third conference in Melbourne, arguably one of the world's most multicultural cities, migrancy presented itself as a kind of ready-made postcolonial theme. This collection's origins, then, were quite circumstantial. The catalyst that allowed the (sprawling and diffuse) possibilities of those circumstantial beginnings to be galvanized into this book form was, ultimately, a particular group of eight papers delivered at the conference (Abbas, Austin, Carter, Ingraham, Jacobs, Lozanovska, Rakatansky and Treadwell) - although such was the richness of the papers not included here that various alternative (historical or geographical) formulations on the general theme might have been developed. A further two chapters have been written for this collection (Cairns and Morris), while five chapters (Davis, Dawson and Johnson, Derrida, Mitchell and Shohat) have been taken from existing publications to flesh out under-represented thematic or theoretical perspectives in the collection.

Many individuals were involved in the organization of the original conference. Thanks first to my co-convenor, Philip Goad, for his collaboration in organizing it, to Mirjana Lozanovska for her assistance in thinking through its themes and to Mathilde Lochert and Hilary Ericksen for their help in running it. I am grateful for the financial and in-kind assistance contributed by the Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning at the University of Melbourne, and to the many members of Melbourne's architectural community who supported the

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