Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Republic

Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Republic

Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Republic

Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Republic

Synopsis

Plato's Republic is perhaps the most significant and important work of philosophy and is Plato's most famous work. No other work has made such an impact on the history of Western thought.In this second edition of the highly successful Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Plato and the Republic , Nickolas Pappas extends his exploration of the text to include substantial revisions and new material. In addition to the existing text, the chapters on Plato's ethics and politics have been revised and enlarged to include two brand new sections. There is further discussion of Plato on aesthetics including a section of Aristotle's criticism of Plato on beauty.Plato and the Republic , 2nd edition assesses and introduces: Plato's life and the background to the Republic ; the text and the ideas of the Republic ; Plato's continuing importance to Western thought.Ideal for students coming to Plato for the first time, this GuideBook will be vital for all students of Plato in philosophy, politics and classics at all levels.

Excerpt

Why another introduction to the Republic, or rather why any? Plato can engage unprepared readers without help. His lively dramatic conversations, his constant nimble references back and forth between mundane phenomena and their metaphysical significance, his high seriousness before the questions of knowledge, morality, community, and death-all in supple prose that never forgets its audience-have made him one of the most widely read philosophers of Europe's history.

But Plato's dialogical style, however enticing, yields poor results when a reader wants either to get an overview of the territory covered, or to worry a single point in greater detail than a conversation allows, to isolate the premises of an argument and discover which ones are doing the work, to find different ways of putting a single Platonic point and see what consequences follow from each restatement. The important issues in Plato's long dialogues appear and vanish: Plato raises one point only to digress to another, or to attend to a detail of his argument. Eventually the originating issue comes up again, but transformed or disguised. The reader who feels lost among the turns of conversation may wish that Plato had also written a few pedestrian treatises covering the same ground as the dialogues, but more explicitly, and when it is necessary more tediously.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.