Nationalism, Democracy and National Integration in China

Nationalism, Democracy and National Integration in China

Nationalism, Democracy and National Integration in China

Nationalism, Democracy and National Integration in China

Excerpt

The centrifugal forces of economic and social liberalization in the People's Republic of China have projected democracy, nationalism and national integration as pivotal issues for the Chinese people and their leaders. These issues are also portentous for many outside China who seek to understand how to engage most effectively with this seemingly ever more powerful nation undergoing political and social as well as economic transformation.

Recognizing this, a regional workshop on nationalism, democracy and national integration in China was held in Brisbane, Australia, in January 2001, to examine the importance of these issues and the complex relationships between them. The 2001 workshop was the genesis of this book. Scholars from Australia, Hong Kong, Mainland China, Singapore and Taiwan took part in the workshop over two days. Authors have revised their workshop papers in the light of workshop discussion, additional research, and further time (which included the 11 September terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, DC in 2001).

The book has 12 chapters in six parts. Chapter 1 is more than an introduction to the book; it introduces some key concepts and identifies linkages and disjunctures in the literature on Chinese nationalism, democracy and national integration. It also identifies key issues on the topics highlighted directly and indirectly by other authors in the book.

The remaining chapters are presented in five parts. Part II examines views held by PRC intellectuals about democracy and nationalism. In particular, it analyses debates between the liberals and 'New Left'. Part III considers Chinese nationalism in Sino-US relations and Part IV examines Taiwanese nationalism in the light of PRC efforts at reunification. Chapters in Part V explore issues of market and democracy in relation to national identity and national integration, and Part VI examines two key institutions - China's system of fiscal transfers and the People's Liberation Army - that impact on national integration.

Many people and organizations have contributed generously to the production of this book and we express our sincere thanks to them. In particular,

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