Multiple Intelligences and Leadership

Multiple Intelligences and Leadership

Multiple Intelligences and Leadership

Multiple Intelligences and Leadership

Synopsis

This edited book presents cutting-edge research looking at the role of multiple intelligence--cognitive (IQ), emotional intelligence, social intelligence--in effective leadership, written by the most distinguished scholars in the two distinct fields of intelligence and leadership. The synergy of bringing together both traditional intelligence researchers and renowned leadership scholars to discuss how multiple forms of intelligence impact leadership has important implications for the study and the practice of organizational and political leadership. This volume emanates from the recent explosion of interest in non-IQ domains of intelligence, particularly in Emotional Intelligence and Social Intelligence. Indeed, the leading EI and SI scholars have contributed to this book. Research described in this book suggests that: (1) possession of multiple forms of intelligence is important for effective leadership; (2) researchers are just beginning to understand the breadth, depth, and potential applications of non-IQ domains of intelligence; (3) incorporating multiple intelligence constructs into existing leadership theories will improve our understanding of effective leadership; and (4) research on multiple intelligence has important implications for both the selection and training of future leaders.

Excerpt

The aim of this series is to publish scholarly works that will alter the direction of research in the organizational sciences. Riggio and his colleagues have written a book that is likely to do just that in regards to the study of leadership. The edited volume should serve to direct the renewed interest in the “trait approach” to leadership by providing thorough assessments of the highly provocative propositions that intelligence is multifaceted and that these facets are differentially related to leadership and effectiveness. These assessments are supplied by some of the most prominent researchers in the fields of leadership and intelligence. Moreover, the book editors, in carefully crafted introductory and concluding chapters, skillfully bring the divergent views evident in the book together. We suspect the book will become a must read for serious leadership scholars and will entice many in that group who have not been taken by the trait approach to view it with considerably more optimism.

Arthur Brief James P. Walsh Series Editors . . .

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