Teaching without Disruption in the Primary School: A Model for Managing Pupil Behaviour

Teaching without Disruption in the Primary School: A Model for Managing Pupil Behaviour

Teaching without Disruption in the Primary School: A Model for Managing Pupil Behaviour

Teaching without Disruption in the Primary School: A Model for Managing Pupil Behaviour

Synopsis

The issue of behaviour has, and always will be, a main dilemma facing schools. Encouraging positive relationships whilst preventing disruption, and motivating students to learn, raises concerns for any teacher. Roland Chaplain handles a variety of critical issues with clarity and vision. He offers a highly practical approach and discusses in detail how teachers cope with stress, how whole school strategies can minimise disruptive behaviour, and how to effectively intervene with students who have emotional and behavioural difficulties. Packed full of activities, case studies and questions to foster readers' own evaluations,nbsp; Teaching without Disruption in the Primary School nbsp;is an indispensable guide for all teachers.

Excerpt

Behaviour management has always, of course, been of interest to teachers and managers in schools. There are many approaches suggested for improving the ways in which teachers 'control' pupils' behaviour, and each has its own strengths and limitations. Which approach is considered most appropriate by an individual teacher or school depends on a range of interlinked organisational and individual factors (school ethos, relationships and the personal characteristics of those who work and study there). There is no single right way of doing things.

This is very much a point-of-view book in which I have used an integrative multilevel model of behaviour management (see Figure i.1) as a basis for understanding and developing the management of behaviour. The model represents a top-down approach, advocating progressive focusing-that is, moving from organisational to individual strategies. If a behaviour policy is working correctly (is well thought out, supported and operated by all staff) it should eliminate many of the low-level disruptive behaviours, making life easier for teachers and providing them with more time to teach. The behaviour policy, or discipline plan, should also provide the fundamental principles for managing individual classrooms and supporting teachers when dealing with extreme behaviour. However, this does not mean that teachers should not enjoy distinctiveness in how they operate their classrooms. Far from it, the whole school framework provides the continuity, which combines with the idiosyncrasies of different teachers and phases, to construct the school's identity. Obviously, there has to be some balance between the three levels in order to minimise confusion for pupils and staff, so a monitoring and evaluation process is recommended (see Figure i.1).

Before proceeding to describe the contents of the chapters, the reader may welcome some orienting comments. Much advice on managing behaviour focuses on teacher-pupil relationships in the classroom and this book is no exception in that respect. However, whilst classroom relationships are central to the learning process, there are many other factors which are also influential and, I argue, essential to effective behaviour

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