Reconstructing the Lifelong Learner: Pedagogy and Identity in Individual, Organisational, and Social Change

Reconstructing the Lifelong Learner: Pedagogy and Identity in Individual, Organisational, and Social Change

Reconstructing the Lifelong Learner: Pedagogy and Identity in Individual, Organisational, and Social Change

Reconstructing the Lifelong Learner: Pedagogy and Identity in Individual, Organisational, and Social Change

Synopsis

How is adult learning used to produce personal, organisational and social change? This interesting examination of adult learning for change illustrates through diverse case studies and theoretical perspectives that personal change is inextricably linked to broader organisational and social change. The authors explore how theorising education as a vehicle for self-change is relevant to the practices of educators, learning specialists and others concerned with promoting learning for change. The book examines the relationship between pedagogy, identity and change and illustrates this through a range of case studies focusing on the following: * Self-help books * Work-based learning * Corporate culture training * AIDS education * Gender education * Sex offender education. A concluding chapter discusses how writing an academic text is itself a pedagogical practice contributing to the identities of authors. This unique text will be of interest to students of education, sociology, cultural studies and change management as well as teachers, educators and professionals involved in lifelong learning or change management in any way.

Excerpt

The five of us who have written this book have been drawn to this collaboration by a belief that identity is an important frame for examining pedagogy, change and lifelong learning today. We come with different backgrounds, different institutional histories, different theoretical allegiances, and have different practical engagements. But we were interested in talking more to each other about the questions and case studies that are the subject of this book. We hope that the book might also be of interest to others who work in some part of the broad terrain that encompasses pedagogy, lifelong learning, organisational and social change.

Our approach to planning and writing this book was to have broad ranging discussions about our theoretical and practical interests and how these relate to the purpose of the book. Once the structure and purpose of the book was settled the initial drafts for each of the chapters were individually assigned. Then followed iterations of group critique, redrafting, and repositioning of each of the chapters within the book as a whole.

As might be expected, this process surfaced both our commonalities and differences. At the most general level we recognise that we are people who are engaged in certain types of 'abstract' theorising around educational issues as well as people who are engaged in 'how do we practice' type issues (as teachers, reformers, administrators and so on). in addition we share a belief that looking at pedagogies through a focus on technologies of the self, and constructing/constructed identities is an interesting and important thing to do right now.

Where we are most differentiated is in our different disciplinary and workplace histories which, not surprisingly, produce different senses of what are the key issues or modes for doing analysis and practice. But it is also interesting that from such diverse disciplinary

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