Childhood, Class, and Kin in the Roman World

Childhood, Class, and Kin in the Roman World

Childhood, Class, and Kin in the Roman World

Childhood, Class, and Kin in the Roman World

Synopsis

It can be difficult to hear the voices of Roman children, women and slaves, given that most surviving texts of the period are by elite adult men. This volume redresses the balance.An international collection of expert contributors go beyond the usual canon of literary texts, and assess a vast range of evidence - inscriptions, burial data, domestic architecture, sculpture and the law, as well as Christian and dream-interpretation literature. Topics covered include:* child exposure and abandonment* children in imperial propaganda* reconstructing lower-class families* gender, burial and status* epitaphs and funerary monuments* adoption and late parenthood.The result is an up-to-date survey of some of the most exciting avenues currently being explored in Roman social history.

Excerpt

Classical scholars use a standard set of abbreviations in referring to ancient works, for example 'Plin. Pan.' (Pliny the Younger's Panegyric of the emperor Trajan), to journals and to commonly used reference manuals (which typically have very long titles). To assist the reader, many of the modern works and journal titles, normally reduced to code among classical insiders, have been spelt out in the entries below.

Contributors were asked to explain some ancient references and to translate the names of key texts at first citation in their individual chapters, but since as usual in scholarly works a number of ancient texts only required one mention it proved too cumbersome to do this comprehensively and consistently. Generally speaking, if a work was referred to frequently in a particular chapter, the standard abbreviation was used after initial explanation. The 'Index of ancient sources' at the back of the book therefore gives the standard abbreviation after the name of the author, for example '(St) Augustine, Civitas Dei, Civ.Dei'. The list of abbreviations below is primarily a guide to collections of coins, inscriptions and so forth, but also includes the less obvious ancient works, as in CJ for Codex Iustinianus, a compilation of responses by emperors to petitions from their subjects.

Standard journal abbreviations are listed in l'Année philologique and online at http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/amphoras/revues.txt. Readers may wish to refer to the Oxford Classical Dictionary (any edition) for additional guidance.

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